Tides and the Lunar Pole Dance

Tides and the Lunar Pole Dance

The tides at the Earth’s Poles tell two different stories.

The Tide Tables for Prudhoe Bay in North Alaska [70.4000° N, 148.5267° W] display a strong contrast between the Winter days of darkness and the Summer days of sunlight.

Prudhoe Bay, Alaska - Tide Table 2013

Graphing the Time Between Tides for Prudhoe Bay shows a clear oscillating pattern that reverts to an average time between High and Low water that approaches 6 hours and 13 minutes.

Additionally, there is an annual pattern [as the Earth orbits the Sun] associated with the Ambient Force which strongly alters the pattern in the Summer and Winter months.

Prudhoe Bay, Alaska - Time Between Tides 2013

The rhythm of the tides at Prudhoe Bay are governed by the latitude of the Moon.

Prudhoe Bay, Alaska - Lunar Altitude and Time Between Tides 2013

Fairbanks, Alaska - Lunar Meridian Altitutde 2013

The Tide Tables for Casey in Antarctica [66.2500° S, 110.5167° E] has more regular [oceanic] tidal pattern although the pattern is “tighter” during the Summer months – especially in January, February and March.

Casey, Antarctica - Tide Table 2013

Graphing the Time Between Tides for Casey shows a clear oscillating pattern that reverts to an average time between High and Low water that approaches 6 hours and 13 minutes.

However, there are very intriguing “peaks” that are not apparent at Prudhoe Bay.

Casey, Antarctica - Time Between Tides

Casey, Antarctica - Lunar Apogee and Perigee 2013

Overall, the tidal rhythm at Casey appears to be governed by the Lunar Apogee-Perigee cycle with marked “peaks” in the Summer and Winter months.

Casey, Antarctica - Time Between Tides - Apogee and Perigee

Casey, Antarctica - Tide Table Aug-Sep 2013

Casey, Antarctica - Time Between Tides - Aug-Sep 2013

The Casey tidal graphs strongly suggest that the Earth’s South Pole [which is actually a magnetic north pole] reflects the “balance of forces” that limits the apogee and perigee of the Moon’s orbit.

The stronger “peaks” in the Winter and Summer months suggest that the “balance of forces” includes the Ambient Force that has been previously discussed.

The Lunar perigee is associated with a short spike in the tidal rhythm that suggests the Moon is easily repelled [like a glancing blow] by the Earth.

The Lunar apogee is associated with a double spike in the tidal rhythm that suggests a more sustained period of “traction” is required to attract the Moon back towards the Earth.

However, there is still a very long way to go before we understand all the mysteries of the tides.

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Gallery | This entry was posted in Astrophysics, Earth, Inventions and Deceptions, Moon, Science, Solar System, Tides, Vortices, Water. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Tides and the Lunar Pole Dance

  1. Pingback: Pattern Recognition | MalagaBay

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