Starry, Starry Night

Starry, Starry Night

The orbital altitude of the International Space Station varies between 310 and 410 kilometres.

The ISS is maintained in a nearly circular orbit with a minimum mean altitude of 330 km (205 mi) and a maximum of 410 km (255 mi), in the centre of the thermosphere, at an inclination of 51.6 degrees to Earth’s equator, necessary to ensure that Russian Soyuz and Progress spacecraft launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome may be safely launched to reach the station.

International Space Station from November 1998 until 2009

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Space_Station#Orbit

ISS Ground Track

Epoch (UTC):         10 July 2015 12:48:03
Perigee height:      401 km
Apogee height:       403 km
Revolutions per day: 15.54928627

ISS – Orbit Developed and maintained by Chris Peat, Heavens-Above GmbH.
http://www.heavens-above.com/orbit.aspx?satid=25544

At these altitudes it’s possible to take some really hot daytime photographs of the Earth and plenty of really cool night time exposures of the RGB [Red-Green-Blue] fluorescing oxygen in the upper atmosphere at altitudes between 100 and 300 kilometres.

Without thermal controls, the temperature of the orbiting Space Station’s Sun-facing side would soar to 250 degrees F (121 C), while thermometers on the dark side would plunge to minus 250 degrees F (-157 C).

There might be a comfortable spot somewhere in the middle of the Station, but searching for it wouldn’t be much fun!

Staying Cool on the ISS
http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2001/ast21mar_1/

The All-American Canal

All-American Canal – 23 April 2009
http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_1333.html

RGB Night Glow

A Good Photograph is One That Sparks a Question – Alex Rivest – 5 May 2012
Earth, Night Glow, Aurora and Atmosphere.
http://auroranightglow.blogspot.com.es/2012_05_01_archive.html

But for me it’s the Starry, Starry Night photographs from the ISS that are really stunning.

Take, for example, this beautiful “Dutch Night” photographed by Andre in 2012.

Dutch Night

ESA – Promise Mission Blog: Focussing on the Dutch Night – 6 March 2012
http://blogs.esa.int/promisse/2012/03/06/blog-andre-dutch-night/

To better appreciate this wonderful Dutch Starry, Starry Night lets see the full image.

Dutch Night - Full

ESA – Promise Mission Blog: Focussing on the Dutch Night – 6 March 2012
http://blogs.esa.int/promisse/2012/03/06/blog-andre-dutch-night/

Now let’s zoom in on that big shiny star [or planet] that is nestled just above the horizon.

Appreciate the stunning surreal detail that almost puts Vincent van Gogh in the shade.

Notice the gently twinkling Red, Green and Blue [RGB] stars that usually seem so serenely white.

Dutch Night - Zoom

ESA – Promise Mission Blog: Focussing on the Dutch Night – 6 March 2012
http://blogs.esa.int/promisse/2012/03/06/blog-andre-dutch-night/

But most of all appreciate the intricate brushwork surrounding the star and its finely detailed cubist atmosphere that forms such a richly coloured tapestry in the night sky.

Dutch Night - Pixels

ESA – Promise Mission Blog: Focussing on the Dutch Night – 6 March 2012
http://blogs.esa.int/promisse/2012/03/06/blog-andre-dutch-night/

Who can forget the beautiful Comet Lovejoy against a Starry, Starry Night background.

Comet Lovejoy

International Space Station Commander Dan Burbank captured spectacular imagery of Comet Lovejoy from about 240 miles above the Earth’s horizon on Wednesday, Dec. 21.

Image Credit: NASA
Station Commander Captures Unprecedented View of Comet – 22 Dec 2011
http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_2137.html

This particular Starry, Starry Night doesn’t display the same rich tapestry of colours one might associate with a Vincent van Gogh but it clearly demonstrates the rectilinear nature of ethereal space and the consummate cubism of cosmology on a computerised canvas.

Comet Lovejoy Zoom

Image Credit: NASA
Station Commander Captures Unprecedented View of Comet – 22 Dec 2011
http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_2137.html

Lets not forget the artistic Aurora Borealis against a Midwest Starry, Starry Night.

Aurora Borealis

In this image taken on Jan. 25, 2012, the Aurora Borealis steals the scene in this nighttime photograph shot from the International Space Station as the orbital outpost flew over the Midwest.

The spacecraft was above south central Nebraska when the photo was taken.

The image, taken at an oblique angle, looks north to northeast.

Image credit: NASA
Expedition 30 – Aurora Borealis Over the Midwest – 16 Feb 2012
http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_2175.html

This Starry, Starry Night with the Aurora Borealis is more in the impressionistic style of William Turner although he is not usually associated the stiff cubist school of artistic astronomy.

Aurora Borealis Zoom

Image credit: NASA
Expedition 30 – Aurora Borealis Over the Midwest – 16 Feb 2012
http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_2175.html

No wonder a Starry, Starry Night looks like a vast network of twinkling lights strung across the firmament in an endless array of beautiful patterns when its photographed from the ISS.

truman-show

Similarly, any independent thinker who questions Settled Solar Science can expect to be labelled a fruitcake, especially if they hypothesise the Earth is spinning inside a fluorescing cloud of gas – just as if they were living inside a fluorescent light bulb.

https://malagabay.wordpress.com/2014/06/03/living-in-a-light-bulb/

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