Putting the F in English

Putting the F in English

Back in the day I was simply told the F word was good old fashioned Anglo-Saxon.

These days, however, Wikipedia likes to promote the idea that its origin is obscure.

Fuck is an obscene English language word, which refers to the act of sexual intercourse and is also commonly used as an intensifier or to denote disdain.

Its origin is obscure but is usually considered to be first attested to around 1475, although it may be considerably older.

In modern usage, the term fuck and its derivatives (such as fucker and fucking) can be used as a noun, a verb, an adjective or an adverb.

There are many common phrases that employ the word, as well as compounds that incorporate it, such as motherfucker and fuckwit.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuck

Although, when pushed, Wikipedia refers to the OED which suggests the F word may have a Germanic origin [which is a frequently deployed – and loosely defined – English euphemism for Scandinavian or Viking origin].

The Oxford English Dictionary states that the ultimate etymology is uncertain, but that the word is “probably cognate” with a number of native Germanic words with meanings involving striking, rubbing, and having sex.

In 2015, Dr. Paul Booth claimed to have found the earliest reference in English court papers from 8 December 1310.

A man in the document is referred to as “Roger Fuckebythenavele”, which is probably a nickname. “Either this refers to an inexperienced copulator, referring to someone trying to have sex with the navel, or its a rather extravagant explanation for a dimwit, someone so stupid they think this that is the way to have sex,” says Booth.

The word has probable cognates in other Germanic languages, such as German ficken (to fuck); Dutch fokken (to breed, to beget); dialectal Norwegian fukka (to copulate), and dialectal Swedish focka (to strike, to copulate) and fock (penis).

There is a theory that fuck is most likely derived from Flemish, German, or Dutch roots, and is probably not from Old English roots.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuck

Digging further into these “obscure” origins Wikipedia reveals that the F word can probably be traced back to Sanskrit which, in its turn, has been officially traced back to “the mid-to-late second millennium BCE.”

This points to a possible etymology where Common Germanic fuk– comes from an Indo-European root meaning “to strike”, cognate with non-Germanic words such as Latin pugno “I fight” or pugnus “fist”.

By application of Grimm’s law, this hypothetical root has the form *pug–.

Yet another possible etymology is from the Old High German word pfluog, meaning “to plow, as in a field.”

This is supported in part by a book by Carl Jung, Psychology of the Unconscious: A Study of the Transformations and Symbolisms of the Libido, in which he discusses the “primitive play of words” and the phallic representation of the plough, including its appearance on a vase found in an archaeological dig near Florence, Italy, which depicts six erect-penised men carrying a plow.

The original Indo-European root for to copulate is likely to be * h3yebh– or *h3eybh–,[citation needed] which is attested in Sanskrit यभति (yabhati), Russian ебать (yebat’ ), Polish jebać, and Serbian јебати (jebati), among others: compare the Greek verb οἴφω (oíphō) = “I have sex with”, and the Greek noun Ζέφυρος (Zéphyros) (which references a Greek belief that the west wind Zephyrus caused pregnancy).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuck

The earliest attested Sanskrit texts are religious texts of the Rigveda, from the mid-to-late second millennium BCE.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sanskrit#Historical_usage

One problem confronting linguists is that [historically] polite English academics, bureaucrats and clergymen generally refrained from committing the F word to paper, parchment or papyrus.

In 2015, Dr. Paul Booth claimed to have found the earliest reference in English court papers from 8 December 1310.

A man in the document is referred to as “Roger Fuckebythenavele”, which is probably a nickname.

“Either this refers to an inexperienced copulator, referring to someone trying to have sex with the navel, or its a rather extravagant explanation for a dimwit, someone so stupid they think this that is the way to have sex,” says Booth.

The usually accepted first known occurrence is in code in a poem in a mixture of Latin and English composed in the 15th century. The poem, which satirizes the Carmelite friars of Cambridge, England, takes its title, “Flen flyys”, from the first words of its opening line, Flen, flyys, and freris (“Fleas, flies, and friars”).

The line that contains fuck reads Non sunt in coeli, quia gxddbov xxkxzt pg ifmk.

Deciphering the phrase “gxddbov xxkxzt pg ifmk”, here by replacing each letter by the previous letter in alphabetical order, as the English alphabet was then, yields the macaronic non sunt in coeli, quia fvccant vvivys of heli, which translated means, “They are not in heaven, because they fuck wives of Ely”.

William Dunbar’s 1503 poem “Brash of Wowing” includes the lines:
“Yit be his feiris he wald haue fukkit: / Ye brek my hairt, my bony ane” (ll. 13–14).

The oldest occurrence of the word in adjectival form (which implies use of the verb) in English comes from the margins of a 1528 manuscript copy of Cicero’s De Officiis.

A monk had scrawled in the margin notes, “fuckin Abbot”.

Whether the monk meant the word literally, to accuse this abbott of “questionable monastic morals,” or whether he used it “as an intensifier, to convey his extreme dismay” is unclear.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuck

The second, far bigger, problem confronting the linguists is the origin of the Latin futuere (futuo) which has almost exactly the same meaning as the English verb “to fuck”.

There may be a kinship with the Latin futuere (futuo), a verb with almost exactly the same meaning as the English verb “to fuck”.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuck

This is a critical question of parentage:

Did Latin acquire the F word from a Germanic language [such as English]?
or
Did Latin originate the F word that was then customised by each Romance languages?

From fūtuere came French foutre, Catalan fotre, Italian fottere, Romanian futere, vulgar peninsular Spanish joder, Portuguese foder

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuck

However, these cunning linguists have no idea regarding the origins of the Latin futuere because there haven’t [apparently] found an appropriate Greek word that fits their preferred narrative.

However, there is no clear past lineage or derivation for the Latin word.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuck

The original Indo-European root for to copulate is likely to be * h3yebh– or *h3eybh–,[citation needed] which is attested in Sanskrit यभति (yabhati), Russian ебать (yebat’ ), Polish jebać, and Serbian јебати (jebati), among others: compare the Greek verb οἴφω (oíphō) = “I have sex with”, and the Greek noun Ζέφυρος (Zéphyros) (which references a Greek belief that the west wind Zephyrus caused pregnancy).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuck

Latin is a member of the broad family of Italic languages.

Its alphabet, the Latin alphabet, emerged from the Old Italic alphabets, which in turn were derived from the Greek and Phoenician scripts.

Historical Latin came from the prehistoric language of the Latium region, specifically around the River Tiber, where Roman civilization first developed.

How and when Latin came to be spoken by the Romans are questions that have long been debated.

Various influences on Latin of Celtic dialects in northern Italy, the non-Indo-European Etruscan language in Central Italy, and the Greek of southern Italy have been detected, but when these influences entered the native Latin is not known for certain.

However, throughout the history of ancient Rome the spoken language differed in both grammar and vocabulary from that of literature, and is referred to as Vulgar Latin.

In addition to Latin, Greek was often spoken by the well-educated elite, who studied it in school and acquired Greek tutors from among the influx of enslaved educated Greek prisoners of war.

In the eastern half of the Roman Empire, which became the Byzantine Empire, the Greek Koine of Hellenism remained current and was never replaced by Latin.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Latin

However, they have tried to claim the Greek pephyka “can be likened to” the F word.

Greek phyō (φύω) has various meanings, including (of a man) “to beget”, or (of a woman), “to give birth to”. Its perfect pephyka (πέφυκα) can be likened[citation needed] to “fuck” and its equivalents in other Germanic languages.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuck

This clearly leaves open the alternate hypothesis that Latin acquired its F word from a Germanic language somewhere along the line in its evolutionary route from Sanskrit [just like some other languages].

Translations
to have sexual intercourse-obscene or vulgar

Aromanian: fut
Faroese: fukka
German: ficken
Japanese: ファックする ‎(fakku surú)
Occitan: fóter, fotre
Scottish Gaelic: faigh muin
Slovene: fukati
Welsh: ffwcio, ffwrcho, ffwrchio

to insert an object into a specified body part

Macedonian: фука ‎(fuka)
Slovene: fukati

an act of sexual intercourse

German: Fick
Slovene: fúk

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/fuck

Unsurprisingly, the mainstream prefers to dismiss the similarities between the Germanic F word and the Latin F word as purely coincidental.

However, the connection to futuere has been disputed – Anatoly Liberman calls it a “coincidence” and writes that it is not likely to have been borrowed from the Low Germanic precursors to fuck.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuck

This is primarily because the mainstream prefers to view the Latin F word as an immaculate conception that was first vocalised in the Italian peninsula.

The Italic languages are a subfamily of the Indo-European language family originally spoken by Italic peoples.

They include the Romance languages derived from Latin (Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Portuguese, Galician, French, Romanian, Occitan, etc.), a number of extinct languages of the Italian Peninsula, including Umbrian, Oscan, Faliscan, South Picene, and Latin itself.

At present, Latin and its daughter Romance languages are the only surviving languages of the Italic language family.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italic_languages

Evidently the mainstream considers Rome to be the cradle of immaculate conceptions whilst Greece is deemed to be simply the cradle of Western Civilization.

There is academic consensus that Classical Greece is the seminal culture which provided the foundation of modern Western culture, democracy, art, theatre, philosophy and science.

For this reason it is known as the cradle of Western Civilization.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cradle_of_civilization

Personally, the more I rummage around in the linguistic history of Western Europe the more sceptical I become regarding the mainstream narrative and the more apparent it becomes that the Machiavellian Monasteries manufactured a written Latin language by homogenising and shoehorning spoken languages into a common Latin character set and grammatical structure.

Therefore, the Romance Languages did not develop from Latin or Vulgar Latin.

The more likely linguistic relationship is that Latin developed as an administrative language of the Roman Empire as it spread across Europe before the Academic Abyss and that the Latin alphabet was subsequently used to develop the written form of the native Romance Languages as the Machiavellian Monasteries spread across Europe after the Academic Abyss.

https://malagabay.wordpress.com/2015/07/05/latin-line-languages/

Either way, the F word seems to be flourishing in the UK.

The statistics tell their own story: the word “fuck” (and its variants) has appeared 705 times in the past year, with a further 269 mentions in the Observer.

The figures for other national newspapers are as follows: Independent 279, Independent on Sunday 74, Times 3, Sunday Times 2, all other papers 0.

Is there too much swearing in the Guardian? – David Marsh
The Guardian – 14 April 2010
http://www.theguardian.com/media/mind-your-language/2010/apr/14/swearing-guardian

Dear Bill,

You and I were, if not best buddies, certainly people that got on.
For 30 odd years we have had a special relationship, DOS, 3.1 WIN95/98 (cough Vista). And you know what I even told my mates how good you were. Things were sweet.

Then win 10.

F*ck you

F*ck you in the a*** with a f****** 10 inch c******r sidewards

F*ck you until you f******g f*****d up f*****d f*****s f*ck off.

Comment by Garry Perez
Microsoft now awfully pushy with Windows 10 on Win 7, 8 PCs
The Register – Shaun Nichols – 15 Oct 2015
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/10/15/pushy_windows_10/

FOOTNOTE
The cunning linguists have exactly the same problem with the dreaded C word.

On the one hand: The English C word is considered by “most sources” to be Germanic.

Cunt is a vulgar term for female genitalia, and is used as a term of disparagement for females and males.

The earliest known use of the word, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, was as a placename for the London street Gropecunt Lane, c 1230.

Scholar Germaine Greer said in 2006 that cunt “is one of the few remaining words in the English language with a genuine power to shock.”

The etymology of “cunt” is a matter of debate, but most sources consider the word to have derived from a Germanic word (Proto-Germanic *kuntō, stem *kuntōn-), which appeared as kunta in Old Norse.

Scholars are uncertain of the origin of the Proto-Germanic form itself.

There are cognates in most Germanic languages, such as the Swedish, Faroese and Nynorsk kunta; West Frisian and Middle Low German kunte; Middle Dutch conte; Dutch kut & kont; Middle Low German kutte; Middle High German kotze (“prostitute”); German kott, and perhaps Old English cot.

The etymology of the Proto-Germanic term is disputed.

It may have arisen by Grimm’s law operating on the Proto-Indo-European root *gen/gon “create, become” seen in gonads, genital, gamete, genetics, gene, or the Proto-Indo-European root *gʷneh₂/guneh₂ “woman” (Greek: gunê, seen in gynaecology).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cunt

On the other hand: Linguists have to find an origin for the Latin C word cunnus.

Relationships to similar-sounding words such as the Latin cunnus (“vulva”), and its derivatives French con, Spanish coño, and Portuguese cona, or in Persian kun (کون), have not been conclusively demonstrated.

Other Latin words related to cunnus are cuneus (“wedge”) and its derivative cunēre (“to fasten with a wedge”, (figurative) “to squeeze in”), leading to English words such as cuneiform (“wedge-shaped”).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cunt

From Middle English cunte, queynt, queynte from Old English *cunte, from Proto-Germanic *kuntōn.

Cognate with West Frisian kunte, dialectal Swedish kunta, dialectal Danish kunte, Dutch kont ‎(“arse”) and Icelandic kunta.

A relationship to Latin cunnus has not been conclusively shown.
Partridge suggests cuneus, a wedge.

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/cunt

FOOTNOTE
In Andalusia the Spanish C word is most definitely an everyday word that is not dreaded.

Although the Spanish C word can be very expressively articulated [just like the English C word] it is generally used in situations where a native English speaker would probably employ a mild expletive such as “damn” or “shit”.

Coño is a common Spanish idiom (somewhat vulgar) primarily used in Spain and the Spanish Caribbean.

Its actual meaning differs according to use, but in Spain and several Latin American countries it is also used in its literal sense as slang for the female genitalia, the vulva.

Coño has become a feature of speech to express emphasis or to stress a wide variety of emotions, actually drifting from any of its original sexual references, in a situation similar to that of “fuck” in American English.

The context, speaker’s sex, pronunciation, and tone define the emotion conveyed, almost as identically done with the word “damn” in English.

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/co%C3%B1o

Jose – you have your presentation in 10 minutes.
Coño! I need more time!

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=co%C3%B1o

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One Response to Putting the F in English

  1. Elfin says:

    Fuckin’ poetry

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