Neal Adams: 08 – The Great Lakes

Neal Adams 08 - The Great Lakes

Neal Adams also utilises his graphical skills to demonstrate the Great Lakes Formation.

See: http://nealadams.com/science-videos/

The Great Lakes (also called the Laurentian Great Lakes, or the Great Lakes of North America) are a series of interconnected freshwater lakes located in northeastern North America, on the Canada–United States border, which connect to the Atlantic Ocean through the Saint Lawrence River.

Consisting of Lakes Superior, Michigan, Huron (or Michigan–Huron), Erie, and Ontario, they form the largest group of freshwater lakes on Earth, containing 21% of the world’s surface fresh water by volume.

The total surface is 94,250 square miles (244,106 km2), and the total volume (measured at the low water datum) is 5,439 cubic miles (22,671 km3).

Due to their sea-like characteristics (rolling waves, sustained winds, strong currents, great depths, and distant horizons) the five Great Lakes have also long been referred to as inland seas.

Lake Superior is the second largest lake in the world by area, and Lake Michigan is the largest lake that is entirely within one country.

The southern half of the Great Lakes is surrounded by the Great Lakes Megalopolis.

The Great Lakes began to form at the end of the last glacial period around 14,000 years ago, as retreating ice sheets carved basins into the land and they became filled with meltwater.

The lakes have been a major highway for transportation, migration and trade, and they are home to a large number of aquatic species.

Many invasive species have been introduced due to trade, and some threaten the region’s biodiversity.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Lakes

The Great Lakes

The Great Lakes Storm of 1913, historically referred to as the “Big Blow,” the “Freshwater Fury,” or the “White Hurricane,” was a blizzard with hurricane-force winds that devastated the Great Lakes Basin in the Midwestern United States and the Canadian province of Ontario from November 7 through November 10, 1913.

The storm was most powerful on November 9, battering and overturning ships on four of the five Great Lakes, particularly Lake Huron. Deceptive lulls in the storm and the slow pace of weather reports contributed to the storm’s destructiveness.

The deadliest and most destructive natural disaster ever to hit the lakes, the Great Lakes Storm killed more than 250 people, destroyed 19 ships, and stranded 19 others.

The financial loss in vessels alone was nearly US $5 million (or about $119,714,000 in today’s dollars).

This included about $1 million at current value in lost cargo totalling about 68,300 tons, such as coal, iron ore, and grain.

The storm, an extratropical cyclone, originated as the convergence of two major storm fronts, fueled by the lakes’ relatively warm waters – a seasonal process called a “November gale”.

It produced 90 mph (145 km/h) wind gusts, waves over 35 feet (11 m) high, and whiteout snowsqualls.

Analysis of the storm and its impact on humans, engineering structures, and the landscape led to better forecasting and faster responses to storm warnings, stronger construction (especially of marine vessels), and improved preparedness.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Lakes_Storm_of_1913

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Gallery | This entry was posted in Catastrophism, Earth, Geology, Glaciology, Greenland, History, Science, Solar System, Water. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Neal Adams: 08 – The Great Lakes

  1. Jim Coyle says:

    Mr. Adams: I have but one question. What set off the expansion of the landmass at the Great lakes? There are no known active faults in that area. It looks like everything blooms out from the Saginaw Bay Mich. region. Why?

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