Author Archives: malagabay

N for Numeral

This gallery contains 23 photos.

The history of Latin Numerals is a surprisingly controversial subject primarily because the Etruscan roots of Latin Numerals are cast in stone in Scotland. Advertisements

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The Great Splice

This gallery contains 22 photos.

Sometimes it’s difficult to avoid concluding the historical narrative has been spliced and diced to create a desired happy ending.

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Shaping The Saxon Shore

This gallery contains 27 photos.

The histories of Britain and France are closely coupled because Britain was once part of Europe. Understanding their histories requires an appreciation of when Britain separated from Europe.

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Shaping Roman Scotland

This gallery contains 18 photos.

Roman forts reflect the geological changes that have shaped Scotland and Scottish history.

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B for Bikini

This gallery contains 22 photos.

Although experts prefer to avoid authenticity arguments there comes a point when even casual observers wonder: Did Roman Men really wear Tights? Did Roman Women really wear Bikinis?

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E for Elephant

This gallery contains 13 photos.

Roman History has – just like an elephant – wrinkles. But – unlike an elephant – Roman History forgets and fudges it’s embarrassing blemishes.

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Gunnar Heinsohn: First Augustus – Antony or Octavian?

This gallery contains 25 photos.

Gunnar Heinsohn 10 September 2018 First Augustus: Antony or Octavian?

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Clark Whelton: Double Interment

This gallery contains 30 photos.

William Shakespeare was 17 when, in 1580, the eminent French philosopher and essayist Michel de Montaigne passed through the Aurelian walls via the Porta del Popolo and entered the city of Rome.

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R for Rome

This gallery contains 12 photos.

The layers of debris and dirt that smothered Ancient Rome have a tale to tell. Whether that tale agrees with the official narrative is another story altogether.

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C for Colossal

This gallery contains 27 photos.

The remaining body parts of the Colossus of Constantine are an enduring reminder that students are taught to ignore truly colossal levels of Cogitative Dissonance.

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F for Fake

This gallery contains 21 photos.

The Farnese Atlas is a remarkable sculpture associated with even more remarkable claims.

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Gunnar Heinsohn: Diocletian: Ingenious or Insane?

This gallery contains 30 photos.

Diocletian: Ingenious or Insane? The Simultaneity of Principate and “Dominate”

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P for Porphyry

This gallery contains 27 photos.

Whilst perusing porphyry sculptures serendipity supplied some surprises.

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S for Sculpture

This gallery contains 21 photos.

A sideways shufty at Roman sculpture suggests things aren’t all they should be.

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A for Augustus

This gallery contains 26 photos.

Taking a sideways look at the historical narrative encompassing the death of the Roman Republic and it’s subsequent resurrection as the Roman Empire highlights some curious characters and discordant data.

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L for Leaguestone

This gallery contains 8 photos.

Deciphering Latin texts includes the seraphic skill of sourcing missing letters and words.

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Gunnar Heinsohn: Saint Paul Was Real

This gallery contains 11 photos.

The lack of non-biblical and/or non-Christian sources on St. Paul of Tarsus/Anatolia (conventionally dated 10-60 CE) and his followers provides revisionists (like Hermann Detering and his school of thought) with the most important reason for deleting a “fabricated Paul” from … Continue reading

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Making Mountains into Molehills

This gallery contains 7 photos.

A diversionary [and defensive] tactic deployed during debates is to claim your opponent is over-reacting and [metaphorically] “making a mountain out of a molehill”.

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M for Marcus

This gallery contains 30 photos.

Applying the Sagan Standard to Roman History means: Extraordinary Roman Narratives require Extraordinary Roman Evidence. The Sagan standard is an aphorism that asserts that “extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence“.

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Gunnar Heinsohn: Exodus

This gallery contains 8 photos.

David and Israel‘s “United Monarchy” provide the most popular targets for the erasure of time-honored personalities and entities from our history books. Nevertheless, archaeological layers consistent with “Yishai“ and “David“ (alphabetical Hebrew) are present in Jerusalem’s period of the Mitanni … Continue reading

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