Category Archives: Epigraphy – Inscriptions

Bristol-Mendip Hoard of 1866

This gallery contains 41 photos.

Somerset silver stashes lead to sequencing surprises and solid gold.

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P for Pederasty

This gallery contains 21 photos.

When reviewing ancient artefacts it’s useful to remember the ancient pederastic iconography associated with bearded and clean shaven men.

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Gothic Wars of The Roman Empire – No Sale

This gallery contains 11 photos.

When revisionist historians slice and dice the Roman Empire narrative they soon discover the remnants of the Gothic Wars are a troublesome waste disposal problem.

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G for Gothicus

This gallery contains 10 photos.

In theory: Inscribed “Gothicus” Victory Titles should be fairly rare before 337 AD.

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Macedonian Madness

This gallery contains 16 photos.

A leisurely rummage through the history of Roman Victory Titles reveals some very unexpected curiosities when serendipity intervenes.

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Pb for Lead

This gallery contains 29 photos.

The mainstream attempt to combine the Settled Science of Lead Pollution in Greenland Ice Cores with the Settled History of the Roman Era is a very revealing train wreck.

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N for Numeral

This gallery contains 23 photos.

The history of Latin Numerals is a surprisingly controversial subject primarily because the Etruscan roots of Latin Numerals are cast in stone in Scotland.

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The Great Splice

This gallery contains 22 photos.

Sometimes it’s difficult to avoid concluding the historical narrative has been spliced and diced to create a desired happy ending.

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B for Bikini

This gallery contains 22 photos.

Although experts prefer to avoid authenticity arguments there comes a point when even casual observers wonder: Did Roman Men really wear Tights? Did Roman Women really wear Bikinis?

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E for Elephant

This gallery contains 13 photos.

Roman History has – just like an elephant – wrinkles. But – unlike an elephant – Roman History forgets and fudges it’s embarrassing blemishes.

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R for Rome

This gallery contains 12 photos.

The layers of debris and dirt that smothered Ancient Rome have a tale to tell. Whether that tale agrees with the official narrative is another story altogether.

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C for Colossal

This gallery contains 27 photos.

The remaining body parts of the Colossus of Constantine are an enduring reminder that students are taught to ignore truly colossal levels of Cogitative Dissonance.

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F for Fake

This gallery contains 21 photos.

The Farnese Atlas is a remarkable sculpture associated with even more remarkable claims.

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P for Porphyry

This gallery contains 27 photos.

Whilst perusing porphyry sculptures serendipity supplied some surprises.

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S for Sculpture

This gallery contains 21 photos.

A sideways shufty at Roman sculpture suggests things aren’t all they should be.

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A for Augustus

This gallery contains 27 photos.

Taking a sideways look at the historical narrative encompassing the death of the Roman Republic and it’s subsequent resurrection as the Roman Empire highlights some curious characters and discordant data.

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L for Leaguestone

This gallery contains 8 photos.

Deciphering Latin texts includes the seraphic skill of sourcing missing letters and words.

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M for Marcus

This gallery contains 30 photos.

Applying the Sagan Standard to Roman History means: Extraordinary Roman Narratives require Extraordinary Roman Evidence. The Sagan standard is an aphorism that asserts that “extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence“.

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E for Epigraphy

This gallery contains 7 photos.

The interpretation of inscriptions has a very long history. Epigraphy is the study of inscriptions or epigraphs as writing; it is the science of identifying graphemes, clarifying their meanings, classifying their uses according to dates and cultural contexts, and drawing … Continue reading

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Enigmatic Egypt: Roman Ruination – Red Sea Hills

This gallery contains 41 photos.

The Roman narrative for Egypt includes the quarrying of monumental hard stones and the mining of gold, emeralds and amethyst in the Red Sea Hills of the Eastern Desert that separates the Nile from the Red Sea. To the east … Continue reading

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Latin Languages: Vanished Visigoths

This gallery contains 18 photos.

At the beginning of the 5th century many migrants are said to have arrived in Iberia. The Visigoths, Suebi, Vandals and Alans arrived in Spain by crossing the Pyrenees mountain range, leading to the establishment of the Suebi Kingdom in … Continue reading

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Latin Languages: Italic Iberians

This gallery contains 19 photos.

The academic assertion that Spanish is a Latin Language is the equivalent to asserting the title of Shakespeare’s Macbeth should be called MacDuff because Lady Macduff makes a brief appearance towards the end of the play. Lady Macduff is a … Continue reading

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Latin Languages: Purged Punic

This gallery contains 18 photos.

The Phoenicians [like the Greeks] have been written out of the Spanish linguistic narrative. They say that history is written by the conquerors, but this wasn’t the case for the Phoenicians. That is probably because, although they settled in the … Continue reading

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Latin Languages: Ionian Iberians

This gallery contains 10 photos.

The linguistic narrative for Iberia begins with isolated Iberians idly talking amongst themselves. According to this narrative the literary abilities of the Iberians hadn’t advanced beyond writing “the names of their dead on gravestones” when the Romans arrived in 218 … Continue reading

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Latin Languages: Cognate Dissonance

This gallery contains 8 photos.

Cognitive Dissonance reigns supreme in the European lands of Latin Languages. One study analyzing the degree of differentiation of Romance languages in comparison to Latin (comparing phonology, inflection, discourse, syntax, vocabulary, and intonation) indicated the following percentages (the higher the … Continue reading

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Enigmatic Egypt: Roman Ruination – Desert

This gallery contains 50 photos.

The academic consensus is that North Africa became “much drier” about 5,000 years ago. The Neolithic Subpluvial, or the Holocene Wet Phase, was an extended period (from about 7500–7000 BCE to about 3500–3000 BCE) of wet and rainy conditions in … Continue reading

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Roman Chronology: The Etruscan Mystery

This gallery contains 16 photos.

One enduring mystery is the extinction of the Etruscan language in 50 AD. The Etruscan language was the spoken and written language of the Etruscan civilization, in Italy, in the ancient region of Etruria (modern Tuscany plus western Umbria and … Continue reading

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Enigmatic Egypt: Roman Ruination – Nile Valley

This gallery contains 48 photos.

When it comes to ancient monuments: Rome beats Cairo by 8 to 3 Egyptian obelisks. But when it comes to burying Roman ruins: Cairo beats Rome by 66 to 15 feet deep. In Roman Egypt, Heliopolis belonged to the province … Continue reading

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Roman Chronology: Credibility Gap

This gallery contains 31 photos.

The chronology of the Roman Empire is built directly upon the very shaky foundations of the Crisis of the Roman Republic which may [or may not] have lasted from 134 to 27 BC. Unfortunately, the academics can’t agree upon whether … Continue reading

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Catacombs of Rome

This gallery contains 24 photos.

The Catacombs of Rome are truly remarkable. Firstly: The Catacombs of Rome include underground burial niches carved into soft volcanic rock. The Catacombs of Rome are ancient catacombs, underground burial places under Rome, Italy, of which there are at least … Continue reading

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Marcomannia

This gallery contains 18 photos.

According to Edward Gibbon the moral Decline of the Roman Empire was caused by a loss of civic virtue whilst the physical Fall of the Roman Empire was outsourced to barbarians. The History of the Decline and Fall of the … Continue reading

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The Heinsohn Horizon: Calendar Conundrum

This gallery contains 14 photos.

Introduction A simple fact checking exercise whilst writing up one topic can produce an unexpected insight that warrants being spun off as a separate narrative. This posting is an example of a spun off narrative. Editing the original text to … Continue reading

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The Heinsohn Horizon: Kom El Deka

This gallery contains 19 photos.

The party line promoted by Wikipedia is that Kom El Deka was the Roman Quarter of Alexandria between the 4th and 7th centuries. Recent archaeology at Kom El Deka (heap of rubble or ballast) has found the Roman quarter of … Continue reading

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Ravenna Revisited: The Deja Vu Dodo

This gallery contains 21 photos.

Foreword The good news for the Academic Acolytes is that their gainful employment is guaranteed in the short term because new discoveries must be careful shaped and retro-fitted onto the existing Etruscan Ecclesiastical Empire embroidery they call history. The bad … Continue reading

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Ravenna Revisited: Triple Point

This gallery contains 17 photos.

Foreword The mainstream has a pathological predilection to prioritise “cock-up before conspiracy”. Hanlon’s razor is an aphorism expressed in various ways including “Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity” or “Don’t assume bad intentions over neglect … Continue reading

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