Category Archives: Geology

Late Paleocene Thermal Maximum

This gallery contains 16 photos.

I’m grateful to Louis Hissink for introducing me to another wonderful can of worms that’s called [amongst other things] the Late Paleocene Thermal Maximum when temperatures are said to have been warmer by about 8 °C for [roughly] 200,000 years … Continue reading

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Enigmatic Egypt: Roman Ruination – Red Sea

This gallery contains 23 photos.

The Egyptian grand tour of Roman ruination concludes with a relaxed Red Sea cruise. The cruise is an excuse for a Red Sea Romp through the dusty archives of ancient annals, medieval manuscripts, archaeological articles and the mainstream mindset. Passengers … Continue reading

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Enigmatic Egypt: Roman Ruination – Red Sea Hills

This gallery contains 41 photos.

The Roman narrative for Egypt includes the quarrying of monumental hard stones and the mining of gold, emeralds and amethyst in the Red Sea Hills of the Eastern Desert that separates the Nile from the Red Sea. To the east … Continue reading

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Louis Hissink: Medusa and Venus

This gallery contains 13 photos.

Human traditions of mighty celestial snakes or serpents in the sky wreaking havoc and destruction on the Earth’s surface remain inexplicable, principally because any geological features that could be associated with these heavenly prodigies are believed to be absent. Absent … Continue reading

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Enigmatic Egypt: Roman Ruination – Desert

This gallery contains 50 photos.

The academic consensus is that North Africa became “much drier” about 5,000 years ago. The Neolithic Subpluvial, or the Holocene Wet Phase, was an extended period (from about 7500–7000 BCE to about 3500–3000 BCE) of wet and rainy conditions in … Continue reading

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Enigmatic Egypt: Roman Ruination – Nile Valley

This gallery contains 48 photos.

When it comes to ancient monuments: Rome beats Cairo by 8 to 3 Egyptian obelisks. But when it comes to burying Roman ruins: Cairo beats Rome by 66 to 15 feet deep. In Roman Egypt, Heliopolis belonged to the province … Continue reading

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Enigmatic Egypt: Roman Ruination – Nile Delta

This gallery contains 24 photos.

One of the many enigmas confronting gradualist academics is Roman Egypt. On the one hand: The history of Graeco-Roman Egypt makes many Western academics dewy-eyed. https://archive.org/stream/ldpd_8542907_000#page/n27/mode/1up Alexandria was founded around a small, ancient Egyptian town c. 332 BC by Alexander … Continue reading

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Catacombs of Rome

This gallery contains 24 photos.

The Catacombs of Rome are truly remarkable. Firstly: The Catacombs of Rome include underground burial niches carved into soft volcanic rock. The Catacombs of Rome are ancient catacombs, underground burial places under Rome, Italy, of which there are at least … Continue reading

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Enigmatic Egypt: Myths and Monsters

This gallery contains 19 photos.

The carefully crafted deep safe space created by anxious academics is designed to distance these terrified titans of thought from calamitous catastrophes and creepy creatures. The beastly Basilosaurus has been banished to “30 to 40 million years ago”. Basilosaurus (“king … Continue reading

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Enigmatic Egypt: The Promised Land

This gallery contains 28 photos.

Whilst wandering through the parched academic desert that smothers the Levant it’s difficult to avoid the conclusion that Egypt is the Promised Land where the Settled Science flows so freely it’s difficult to find the insights amongst all the academic … Continue reading

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Enigmatic Egypt: The Walrus and the Carpenter

This gallery contains 15 photos.

The realm of Geological Time has [at least] a couple of confounding countenances. On the one hand: Since the end of the Cretaceous Period 66 million years ago the serenely sluggish sea has carved out the Strait of Dover to … Continue reading

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Enigmatic Egypt: Sahara Seas

This gallery contains 15 photos.

200 years ago Georges Cuvier introduced academia to the concept of “periodic catastrophic floods”. Jean Léopold Nicolas Frédéric, Baron Cuvier (1769 – 1832), known as Georges Cuvier, was a French naturalist and zoologist, sometimes referred to as the “father of … Continue reading

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Supernova SN 185

This gallery contains 11 photos.

One of the Jewels in the Crown of Settled Science that’s been extracted from the mire of mainstream manuscripts and academic assertions is Supernova SN 185. A supernova is a transient astronomical event that occurs during the last stellar evolutionary … Continue reading

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The Heinsohn Horizon and The Parting of the Red Sea

This gallery contains 8 photos.

One of the points of commonality between the history of Hindu Astronomy and Leona Libby’s Old Japanese Cedar Tree Chronology is that they both suggest there was [roughly] a 300 year period of geological and cultural disruption leading up to … Continue reading

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The Atomic Comet: On The Far Side

This gallery contains 21 photos.

Following the Terrestrial Thorium line of enquiry to the Far Side of the Moon very rapidly becomes a fascinating journey to the Far Side as the Settled Science turns to dust and this independent observer is led to conclude the … Continue reading

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The Atomic Comet: Sea of Showers

This gallery contains 18 photos.

One of the more surprising lines of enquiry into the origins of Terrestrial Thorium is the esoteric narrative of the Thorium enriched KREEP deposits on the Nearside of the Moon. The remarkably unbalanced distribution of Lunar Thorium mirrors the equally … Continue reading

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The Atomic Comet: The Carolina Bays

This gallery contains 16 photos.

The curious coincidence of “known” Comets with sporadic spikes in Thorium 232 opens up a new line of enquiry that suggests the Carolina Bays have a Cometary connection. This particular line of enquiry originates from trying to determine whether the … Continue reading

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The Atomic Comet: A Velikovsky Vindication

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One of Immanuel Velikovsky’s more outrageous heresies contained within Worlds in Collision is the conclusion that Comet Venus was producing petroleum gases. Worlds in Collision is a book written by Immanuel Velikovsky and first published April 3, 1950. … The … Continue reading

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The Heinsohn Horizon and The Migration Period

This gallery contains 14 photos.

Gunnar Heinsohn very politely points out the 700 years between the 230s and 930s AD “have neither strata nor tree samples”. Therefore, some 700 years of the 1st millennium (230 to 930s) have neither strata nor tree samples for C14 … Continue reading

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The Silchester Mystery

This gallery contains 7 photos.

Archaeologists have learnt a lot about Roman Silchester [aka Calleva] in the last 125 years. Calleva, formally Calleva Atrebatum (“Calleva of the Atrebates”), was an Iron Age oppidum and subsequently a town in the Roman province of Britannia and the … Continue reading

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