Category Archives: Ravenna Revisited

Ravenna Revisited: The Great Sack Race

This gallery contains 3 photos.

Once upon a time [long before the invention television, radio and the printing press] the Ecclesiastical News Network broadcast propaganda from the pulpit. Many of these propaganda productions have been embellished and immortalised by the creative writing skills of the … Continue reading

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Ravenna Revisited: The Deja Vu Dodo

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Foreword The good news for the Academic Acolytes is that their gainful employment is guaranteed in the short term because new discoveries must be careful shaped and retro-fitted onto the existing Etruscan Ecclesiastical Empire embroidery they call history. The bad … Continue reading

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Ravenna Revisited: A Byzantine Birth

This gallery contains 15 photos.

Success and growth are usually associated with organisational challenges. For the Etruscan Ecclesiastical Empire these challenges were especially interesting because whenever they acquired a new territory or culture they also acquired it’s history. Their greatest challenge was shaping and retro-fitting … Continue reading

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Ravenna Revisited: Triple Point

This gallery contains 17 photos.

Foreword The mainstream has a pathological predilection to prioritise “cock-up before conspiracy”. Hanlon’s razor is an aphorism expressed in various ways including “Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity” or “Don’t assume bad intentions over neglect … Continue reading

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Ravenna Revisited: The Heinsohn Horizon

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The Greek Termination Event in 607 CE is characterised by earthquakes and flooding while the Heinsohn Horizon in 912 CE is characterised by heat, fire and dust. Based upon the mud that reached the height of the ground floor door … Continue reading

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Ravenna Revisited: Greek Termination Event

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The Greek Termination Event is one of P N Oak’s Missing Chapters of History. Based upon the mud that reached the height of the ground floor door lintel of the Mausoleum of Theoderic in Ravenna it seems this event was … Continue reading

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Ravenna Revisited: Basilica of San Vitale

This gallery contains 11 photos.

The monuments of Ravenna propel the visitor into the strange domain of cultural appropriation where one man’s glorious restoration is another’s heinous desecration. Where the re-branding veneer of fake restorations and obfuscating modifications are deemed authentic because they “have their … Continue reading

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Ravenna Revisited: Mausoleum of Theoderic – Tragedy

This gallery contains 15 photos.

When the layers of farce are peeled away it’s possible to discern the “half abandoned” tragedy of Ravenna that’s full of “sumptuous splendour and incredible decay”. Upon the loneliest and most desolate shore of Italy, where the vast monotony of … Continue reading

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Ravenna Revisited: Mausoleum of Theoderic – Farce

This gallery contains 11 photos.

The Mausoleum of Theoderic is a fascinating structure with an intriguing history that lurches between tragedy and farce as the mainstream desperately attempts to control the narrative. Act 1: Farce Scene 1: King Theoderic’s Sarcophagus English Wikipedia proudly displays an … Continue reading

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Ravenna Revisited: Mausoleum of Galla Placidia

This gallery contains 12 photos.

Although it’s said All Roads Lead to Rome the historical narrative of the Western Roman Empire initially takes you to 1st millennium Ravenna when you travel back in time. Ravenna is the capital city of the Province of Ravenna, in … Continue reading

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Justinian’s Raging Bulls

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The Plague of Justinian has been associated with the extreme weather events of 535–536 AD which [in its turn] has been associated with “debris from space impacting the Earth”. The extreme weather events of 535–536 were the most severe and … Continue reading

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