Category Archives: Uniformitarianism

The Late Paleocene Event

This gallery contains 22 photos.

The most telling aspect of the Late Paleocene Event is the divergent data. The ooze on the Shatsky Rise at ≈ 32° North has an outlier δ18O high spike. The ooze on the Maud Rise at ≈ 66° South has … Continue reading

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Late Paleocene Thermal Minimum

This gallery contains 16 photos.

If you’ve ever felt the Earth Sciences are rather special then you’ve arrived at the right place. On the other hand: If you believe the Earth Sciences are entirely based upon robust science then you’ve arrived at the wrong place … Continue reading

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Late Paleocene Thermal Maximum

This gallery contains 16 photos.

I’m grateful to Louis Hissink for introducing me to another wonderful can of worms that’s called [amongst other things] the Late Paleocene Thermal Maximum when temperatures are said to have been warmer by about 8 °C for [roughly] 200,000 years … Continue reading

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Louis Hissink: Medusa and Venus

This gallery contains 13 photos.

Human traditions of mighty celestial snakes or serpents in the sky wreaking havoc and destruction on the Earth’s surface remain inexplicable, principally because any geological features that could be associated with these heavenly prodigies are believed to be absent. Absent … Continue reading

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Roman Chronology: The Etruscan Mystery

This gallery contains 16 photos.

One enduring mystery is the extinction of the Etruscan language in 50 AD. The Etruscan language was the spoken and written language of the Etruscan civilization, in Italy, in the ancient region of Etruria (modern Tuscany plus western Umbria and … Continue reading

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Roman Chronology: Credibility Gap

This gallery contains 31 photos.

The chronology of the Roman Empire is built directly upon the very shaky foundations of the Crisis of the Roman Republic which may [or may not] have lasted from 134 to 27 BC. Unfortunately, the academics can’t agree upon whether … Continue reading

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Roman Chronology: Crime Scene Reconstruction

This gallery contains 17 photos.

In theory: a crime scene reconstruction provides some useful insights. In practice: a crime scene reconstruction can also provide some real surprises. Crime reconstruction or crime scene reconstruction is the forensic science discipline in which one gains “explicit knowledge of … Continue reading

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The Cock-Up of the 3rd Century

This gallery contains 14 photos.

Getting to grips with a reconciliation error is usually a laborious exercise that involves critically examining the data, identifying errors and [very occasionally] discovering malfeasance. However, reconciling a 60 Year Discrepancy in Roman history is another story altogether. 60 Year … Continue reading

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The Destruction of Ancient Rome

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Rodolfo Lanciani was an archaeologist who produced “unsurpassed” plans of Ancient Rome. Rodolfo Amedeo Lanciani (1845 – 1929) was an Italian archaeologist, a pioneering student of ancient Roman topography, and among his many excavations was that of the House of … Continue reading

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Enigmatic Egypt: The Walrus and the Carpenter

This gallery contains 15 photos.

The realm of Geological Time has [at least] a couple of confounding countenances. On the one hand: Since the end of the Cretaceous Period 66 million years ago the serenely sluggish sea has carved out the Strait of Dover to … Continue reading

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Enigmatic Egypt: Sahara Seas

This gallery contains 15 photos.

200 years ago Georges Cuvier introduced academia to the concept of “periodic catastrophic floods”. Jean Léopold Nicolas Frédéric, Baron Cuvier (1769 – 1832), known as Georges Cuvier, was a French naturalist and zoologist, sometimes referred to as the “father of … Continue reading

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Johannes de Sacrobosco: A Cuckoo In The Nest

This gallery contains 11 photos.

One of the more curious characters to emerge from the mire of medieval manuscripts is a monastic scholar with a severe identity crisis: Johannes de Sacrobosco. Johannes de Sacrobosco, also written Ioannis de Sacro Bosco (c. 1195 – c. 1256), … Continue reading

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Comet Halley Clock

This gallery contains 10 photos.

Life is full of surprises. Having stumbled upon the Comet Halley Calendar [in the mire of mainstream medieval manuscripts and academic assertions] I wasn’t expecting any more revelations. I was content with establishing a rough estimate for the number of … Continue reading

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Comet Halley Calendar

This gallery contains 16 photos.

Researching the Gregorian Calendar Reforms involves a journey into the mire of mainstream medieval manuscripts and academic assertions that so inspired J R R Tolkien when he was a Professor of Anglo-Saxon between 1925 and 1945. Venturing into this swamp … Continue reading

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Heinsohn Horizon: Chinese Christmas Cake

This gallery contains 9 photos.

When Europe started carving up the world the acolytes of empire started carving up history to support their beliefs and interests. By 1850 the acolytes of empire had diced and sliced the Annals of China to create a great and … Continue reading

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The Heinsohn Horizon: 21st July 365 AD

This gallery contains 14 photos.

The finer details of Roman History are as slippery as an eel and the events of the 21st July 365 AD are especially slippery. The 365 Crete earthquake occurred at about sunrise on 21 July 365 in the Eastern Mediterranean, … Continue reading

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The Heinsohn Horizon and The Parting of the Red Sea

This gallery contains 8 photos.

One of the points of commonality between the history of Hindu Astronomy and Leona Libby’s Old Japanese Cedar Tree Chronology is that they both suggest there was [roughly] a 300 year period of geological and cultural disruption leading up to … Continue reading

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The Atomic Comet: A Velikovsky Vindication

This gallery contains 21 photos.

One of Immanuel Velikovsky’s more outrageous heresies contained within Worlds in Collision is the conclusion that Comet Venus was producing petroleum gases. Worlds in Collision is a book written by Immanuel Velikovsky and first published April 3, 1950. … The … Continue reading

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1472: A Very Particular and Curious Comet

This gallery contains 11 photos.

The Comet of 1472 is a much maligned milestone in the annals of observational science simply because the master of St. Peter’s College [Cambridge] chronicled the comet’s precession as it decayed, diminished and [finally] disappeared whilst orbiting the Earth. On … Continue reading

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Flipping Geology: Walking on Sunshine

This gallery contains 11 photos.

The 21st century Earth Scientists have a problem with their medieval mysticism that defines nine concentric circles of Hell within the Earth. In the poem, Hell is depicted as nine concentric circles of torment located within the Earth; it is … Continue reading

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